Visiting Scholars and Senior Visiting Fellows

Prof. Anjan Chakravartty, University of Notre Dame

Anjan’s research focuses on central issues in the philosophy of science, metaphysics, and epistemology, including topics in the philosophy of physics and biology. Much of this work revolves around debates about scientific realism (such as versions of entity realism and structural realism) and antirealism (especially versions of empiricism), as well as the nature of dispositions, causation, laws of nature, and natural kinds. He has worked on scientific modeling, representation, and attendant issues such as the nature of abstraction and idealization, and the consequences these practices have for concepts such as knowledge and truth, as well as the relationship between science, metaphysics, and the philosophy of science. His most recent book is called Scientific Ontology: Integrating Naturalized Metaphysics and Voluntarist Epistemology (Oxford University Press, 2017).


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Prof. Sandra Mitchell, University of Pittsburgh

Sandra’s primary area of research is philosophy of biology. Her work covers a variety of epistemological and metaphysical issues in the philosophy of science, including scientific explanations of complex behaviour; emergence; laws in biology, and more recently perspectivalism in modelling practices in biology. Her publications tackle also the methodological consequences of biological robustness and key issues in policy-making. In 2015 Sandra was elected President of the Philosophy of Science Association. She is also a member of The American Association for the Advancement of Science. Her latest book is Unsimple Truths. Science, Complexity, and Policy (University of Chicago Press 2009). Sandra is visiting us in Edinburgh in May 2016 to collaborate with us on our ERC project.

For more info on Sandra’s research interests and publications, please visit her personal website: http://www.pitt.edu/~smitchel/


Nora Boyd, University of Pittsburgh

Nora is a doctoral candidate in History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh.  Her dissertation topic is “Scientific Progress at the Boundaries of Experience”, supervised by John Norton.  Recently she has been working on explicating a characterisation of genuinely cumulative empirical evidence and the conditions under which empirical adequacy can be adjudicated in a responsible way.  These topics have lead her to think about methodological practices in data processing and their epistemological consequences.  Nora is particularly interested in philosophy of astrophysics and cosmology, philosophy of experiment, and empiricist philosophies of science.  Before beginning graduate work at Pittsburgh, she received an M.A. in Philosophy at the University of Waterloo and worked as a research engineer for a nuclear physics laboratory at the University of Washington.

Please visit Nora’s website to find out more about her work and interests: http://www.pitt.edu/~nmb58/